Was Slavery the cause of the War?

by tgun 8/18/2019

So they wrote and passed an amendment to protect the institution of slavery a month and a half before the war started and ratified an amendment to end slavery six months after the war ended.

And the war was about slavery?

Probably not!

No, slavery had nothing to do with the war. Slavery is mentioned in a few of the declarations of causes. But, they're declarations of causes not declarations of war. Secession and War are two completely different topics.

Washington DC did not want to end slavery. If they wanted to end slavery they would have proposed an amendment to end slavery.


When President Lincoln requested militia from the several States there's not a mention of slavery.

"BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: A PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS the laws of the United States have been, for some time past, and now are opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed, in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law.

Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call forth, and hereby do call forth, the militia of the several States of the Union, to the aggregate number of seventy-five thousand, in order to suppress said combinations, and to cause the laws to be duly executed." (In part)


Lincoln didn't mention slavery in his proclamation for militia because slavery didn't have anything to do with his war. Lincoln never told the States that he needed 75,000 militia to end slavery. Slavery was legal in the United States. It would have been against the law to attempt to end slavery. If you want to end slavery you propose an amendment, you don't start a war.

You cannot end slavery in the United States without an amendment. You need to amend Article 4 Section 2 Clause 3; "No Person held to Service or Labour in one State, under the Laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in Consequence of any Law or Regulation therein, be discharged from such Service or Labour, but shall be delivered up on Claim of the Party to whom such Service or Labour may be due.".

In President Lincoln's first inaugural address on March 4, 1861, he stated (to the entire world); "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so."

In that same address Lincoln gave strong support for the Corwin amendment (which passed the house and senate two days prior). The Corwin amendment, if ratified by the States, would protect the institution of slavery.

Amendments

All those familiar with the United States Constitution are aware of the amendment process.

Where was the amendment to end slavery in 1840, 1850,1860, 1861-1864?

There wasn't an amendment to end slavery in 1861, but there was the aforementioned amendment to guarantee the States that the U.S. Congress would never interfere with the institution of slavery. And that proposed amendment makes the idea that the war was fought to free slaves inconceivable. The proposed Corwin Amendment which passed both United States houses assured the States that congress would not interfere with slavery. The Corwin Amendment was passed onto the States on March 2, 1861, a month and a half before the war started.

  • March 2, 1861 Corwin Amendment passed onto the States
  • March 4, 1861 Lincoln's first inaugural address
  • April 15, 1861 Lincoln request militia from the several states


  • Nobody proposed an amendment to end slavery in 1861, that's hard evidence that proves the war wasn't about slavery. The United States Congress proposed and passed an amendment to keep slavery indefinitely, that fact crushes what's left of the argument.

    The Corwin Amendment
    "No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which will authorize or give congress the power to abolish or interfere, within any State, with domestic institutions thereof, including that of persons held to labor or service by the laws of said State." March 2, 1861

    A month and a half before the war started the Thirty-Sixth United States Congress passed an amendment to guarantee that congress could/would never write the 13th amendment.

    Forgive my constant repetition. If the 1861 amendment would have been passed, the 1865 amendment to end slavery could not have been written.

    From President Lincoln's first inaugural address (a message to the entire world):

    "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so." President Abraham Lincoln, March 4, 1861

    Again, from Lincoln's first inaugural address, listen to Lincoln speak highly of the Corwin amendment:

    "I understand a proposed amendment to the Constitution—which amendment, however, I have not seen—has passed Congress, to the effect that the Federal Government shall never interfere with the domestic institutions of the States, including that of persons held to service. To avoid misconstruction of what I have said, I depart from my purpose not to speak of particular amendments so far as to say that, holding such a provision to now be implied constitutional law, I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable."--Abraham Lincoln, first inaugural address

    The U.S. Congress, a month and a half before the war began, proposed and passed an amendment in favor of slavery. Two days later on March 4th Abraham Lincoln tells the world that he favors the aforementioned amendment saying, "holding such a provision to now be implied constitutional law, I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable.". In the same inaugural address United States President Abraham Lincoln tells the world, "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.".

    It couldn't be more well recorded. Lincoln tells the world that he has no lawful right to free slaves and has no inclination to do so. And the madness; 22 months later the Emancipation Proclamation. Lincoln made it quite clear that he understood he had no lawful right to interfere with slavery, so what is he doing with the Emancipation Proclamation?



    "With scarcely one soldier in twenty in the Southern Armies owning even one slave and with thousands of Northern soldiers being slave owners, is it reasonable to assert that each went to war to fight against his own interests ? Is it not a repulsive thought that any mind could be so constituted as to believe that Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnson and Stonewall Jackson fought their immortal fight to hold some negroes in slavery! Nothing could be more unfair or untruthful than to represent the North as going into the War Between the States as upon some holy crusade to free the slaves from their Southern owners, to whom, it may be remarked in passing, in very large measure they had been sold by this same North and the money not refunded!"--The Gray Book: By Sons of Confederate Veterans (1920)